Goal Box

ALEXANDER EDLER, CANUCKS — MILESTONE

2017-04-10T01:54:17+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Exclude From Main Feed, Goal Box|

ALEXANDER EDLER, Canucks
MILESTONE
  • Wrist Shot
  • Door Step
  • Goaltender Pulled for Extra Skater
  • Final Minute
  • Third Period

The players remaining on the Vancouver roster from the Canucks Stanley Cup final team of 2011 has dwindled to the Sedins and Alexander Edler now that Alex Burrows is in Ottawa. Naturally both Sedins were on the ice when Edler scored for his 300th career point, at Rogers Arena against the Oilers. It was the second time this season Edler had scored after the goaltender was pulled for an extra skater in the waning moments of the third period.

With Vancouver trailing 3-1, Edler had no reason to protect the blue line and stationed himself by the side of the net. When the puck made it to the goal mouth, Edler was in position to swat it home, just off the right corner of the crease.

It was the sixth goal of the season for Edler, who has been remarkably consistent through the years with his goal contributions. Going back to the 2007-08 season, his first full year in the NHL, the Swedish defenseman has never scored fewer than five or more than 11 goals in a season. And for the last five years, Edler’s performance has especially plateaued, always scoring between six and eight goals over that span, with just about half coming on the power play.

4/8/2017 vs. Edmonton.
Highlight available at NHL.com.

BROCK BOESER, CANUCKS — FIRST NHL GOAL

2017-03-27T11:26:19+00:00 March 27th, 2017|Exclude From Main Feed, Featured Goal Box, Goal Box|

BROCK BOESER, Canucks
FIRST NHL GOAL

First-round draft pick Brock Boeser gave Cancuks fans continued hope that the transition years might be sped up a bit by scoring his first NHL goal in his first game last night against the Wild in his native Minnesota. The goal would turn out to be the game-winner for Vancouver in its 4-2 victory.

In truth, the opportunity was handed to him on a silver platter — but he had some world-class help in breaking into the scoring column at the NHL level.

The breakout pass from the Canucks zone was something they don’t teach at the midget level — or at any other stage of competition. But it was brilliant.

Sven Baertschi blocked a shot near the blue line, but his stick fell to the ice in two pieces immediately. Advantage . . . Canucks. Baertschi did a pirouehette, but not before backfooting the puck onto the stick of Boeser bolting out of the zone. Boeser immediately flipped it to Bo Horvat who had gained even more speed leaving the Canucks end of the ice.

Horvat broke in alone on Minnesota goaltender Darcy Kuemper, but Kuemper stood up to his backhand from the low slot. The rebound, however, lay at Kuemper’s feet in the crease. Before he could sweep it away, Boeser swooped in and slapped it to the back of the net.

Hearty hugs in the corner from his on-ice mates and then the procession past the bench, where his teammates were leaning forward in eagerness to congratulate Boeser. Not too much emotion on his face. More a wry grin about his dream of playing in the NHL culminating in a first goal which required no skill greater than not falling down while trying to apply stick to puck.

But not only did Boeser score his first goal in his first game, he also put three other shots on goal during the game to account for four of Vancouver’s 21 in the game. As debuts go, this one left hungry Canuck fans eager for the next look.

3/13/2017 vs. Boston

MARKUS GRANLUND, CANUCKS — BEST IN CLASS (ODD-MAN RUSH, 3-ON-2)

2017-03-15T12:15:28+00:00 March 15th, 2017|Exclude From Main Feed, Featured Goal Box, Goal Box|

MARKUS GRANLUND, Canucks
BEST IN CLASS — ODD-MAN RUSH (3-on-2)

Though the Canucks are many years removed from the form they showed during their deep runs in the Stanley Cup playoffs, there is still a lot of magic on the sticks of the Sedin twins. Linemate Markus Granlund made sure that their penchant for finding the open man in a nanosecond didn’t go unrewarded against Boston.

A 3-on-2 rush developed early in the Canucks end following a rebound that flew on to Granlund’s stick at the left faceoff dot. Immediately he handed off to Henrik and the pair headed up ice.

By the time they’d reached the Bruins zone, Henrik threw a cross-ice pass to a streaking Daniel at the left dot. Granlund entered the slot like clockwork and Daniel found him all alone in front of Tuuka Rask, even though by this time four Bruins had recovered. On his off wing, Granlund was able to sweep Daniel’s pass in to the net in one motion, concluding a precise 3-on-2 break where the passes were all perfectly timed and placed and no skating stride was misdirected.

A collection of economical moves all executed as though the three players saw the play unfold even before they left their own end.

This clip contains two goals scored by Granlund that night. Move to the 1:02 mark to see this one.

3/13/2017 vs. Boston

MARKUS GRANLUND, CANUCKS — BEST IN CLASS (DEFLECTION, OWN STICK)

2017-02-21T16:11:50+00:00 February 21st, 2017|Exclude From Main Feed, Featured Goal Box, Goal Box|

MARKUS GRANLUND, Canucks
BEST IN CLASS — DEFLECTION (OWN STICK)

Markus Granlund of the Canucks demonstrated uncommon hand-eye-back coordination when he scored on a deflection against Philadelphia.

It’s difficult enough to alter the course of a zooming hockey puck with just the tip of the stick. But to peform the task while falling to the ice following a cross-check — well that’s something you don’t see teams much practicing.

The Canucks center, however, performed the trick perfectly while being knocked to the ice by Philadelphia’s Ivan Provorov. Complicating matters was that this was a long-distance deflection.

Granlund was set up in the lower part of the left circle. As he trained his eye on a slap shot from the left point by Daniel Sedin, he got whacked in his back by Provorov with enough force that he lost his balance and fell forward. Nonetheless, he kept his stick blade perfectly in place, about knee-high. By the time Granlund executed the deflection he had only one leg anchored to the ice, yet the puck couldn’t have been more perfectly placed, as it slid into the net, just inside the near post.

2/19/2017 vs. Philadelphia

ALEXANDER EDLER, CANUCKS — YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN

2017-02-20T00:53:35+00:00 February 20th, 2017|Exclude From Main Feed, Goal Box|

ALEXANDER EDLER, Canucks
YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN
  • Slap Shot
  • Neutral Zone (Offensive Side of Red Line)
  • First Period

It’s Saturday night and you’re playing at home. The kind of game the fans in attendance have been looking forward to all week. The kind of night where kids see their first hockey game. And for the first 12 minutes and 45 seconds you can’t even manage a bloody shot on goal?

If the hands of Canuck fans were getting numb from sitting on them all night, in the next instant they were going to cheer. But would it be a Bronx cheer? After all, Alexander Edler was preparing to at least make sure the team wouldn’t go shotless in the first period by throwing the puck on goal from center ice instead of dumping it in the corner. A dubious strategy, but maybe something to get the shot clock monkey off the Canucks backs.

And a funny thing happened. Funny things often happen when you, yes, shoot the puck on the net. And when it happens to be a 90-foot knucklepuck, you’ve just entered a goaltender’s worst nightmare: No need to move all night and now this crazy disc is wobbling at you from such a distance where you really should blink before it gets there to keep your eyes fresh.

Calgary goalie Brian Elliott got to experience just that sequence of circumstances. And when the puck dropped like an Uncle Charlie curveball, he had no real alternative but to slump down in front of his crease and deal with his frustration alone, since it would be a few moments before the rest of the players arrived on the scene.

A couple of funny things happened after that too. The Canucks wound up with nine shots in the period after having none for the first 12:45. Secondly, nobody scored again until there were six seconds left in regulation, when Mark Giordano tied it for the Flames on a similarly mysterious goal from outside the middle of the left circle.

Fittingly it took only 34 seconds of overtime to produce a winner. Why fitting? The goal was scored by Vancouver’s Christopher Tanev. It was his first goal this year in 35 games played.

2/18/2017 vs. Calgary.
Highlight available at NHL.com.

BRANDON SUTTER, CANUCKS — STOP AND GO, FOOT ON THE CLUTCH

2017-02-18T11:03:11+00:00 February 18th, 2017|Exclude From Main Feed, Goal Box|

BRANDON SUTTER, Canucks
STOP AND GO, FOOT ON THE CLUTCH
  • Wrist Shot
  • Right Circle (Middle, Outside Dot)
  • Goaltender Pulled
  • Final Minute
  • Third Period

The Canucks were into their 59th minute against Nashville without having put a goal on the board. But that was sort of OK because the Predators had only one themselves.

With their net empty, the Canucks found themselves, surprisingly, on a 3-on-2 break entering the Nashville zone. But the three were bunched together at the blue line, all on the right side of the Predators end.

Sven Baertschi realized that little separation from the two Nashville defenders was likely, so he sent the puck to Brandon Sutter on the outside of the break, near the boards. The two Predator defenders peeled off to cover the two other Vancouver skaters. So Sutter got creative.

As he hit the faceoff dot, still well to the outside of it, he abruptly pulled up and dragged his lead leg back so he could square his body for a shot and drift a little to the center of the zone to gain some precious inches for his shooting angle.

And then he let loose a sharp wrist shot, which Nashville goaltender Pekka Rinne couldn’t quite squeeze with his pads.

Though the Predators lost the point for the moment, they gained it back in overtime, turning the tables on Vancouver when Calle Jarnkrok scored a shorthanded goal with just 1.5 seconds remaining.

1/10/2017 vs. Nashville.
Highlight available at NHL.com.

HENRIK SEDIN, CANUCKS — MILESTONE

2017-02-13T16:42:27+00:00 January 26th, 2017|Exclude From Main Feed, Goal Box|

HENRIK SEDIN, Canucks
MILESTONE
Henrik Sedin is Mr. Canuck to the current generation of Vancouver-ites, just as surely as Trevor Linden or perhaps Pavel Bure was in the 90s. So when Henrik became the first Canuck to reach 1000 career points in a Vancouver uniform it created a fantastic celebration at Rogers Arena. Fittingly, brother Daniel — who isn’t too terribly far behind Henrik — set up the goal. And adding to the kinship angle, Henrik backhanded the puck past Roberto Luongo, with whom the two brothers plus Ryan Kesler formed the nucleus of the dominant Canuck teams of the previous decade.
1/20/2017 vs. Florida